Tag Archives: connected educator

#TLDW2016

When you are surrounded with positive people that believe in each other’s strength, you have no way of going but moving forward.

Here’s my takeaway after the 3-day of learning and networking with wonderful educators, #peel21st.


For all the educators that helped me out along the way and spent the time to listen to what I had to say, a BIG THANK YOU! All kinds of exciting things are on our way as we begin a new journey of learning together with our students.

Do You Know How to Take a Video?

A slice of video for the Slice of Life Story Challenge for Day 14.

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8 February 2013: I still have the VVS here.

Taking photos and recording videos are just a click away now using one gadget: smartphone. My video camera with the hard disk that I bought years ago sits in the armoire now. During our vacation in Portugal back in January, I brought it. Did I ever use the camcorder? No. Did I record some videos? Yes. How? Using my phone.

A few days ago, as I was scrolling down my Twitter feed, I came across the tweet below.

After watching the video, I couldn’t help it but jumped into the conversation.

Because of this takeaway, I am not going to let this challenge be over without passing on the learning that took place in a matter of minutes with these wonderful #PLN, Alice Keeler, Phillip Cowell, and Josh Shepard connecting globally, sharing and laughing!

 

Twitter

A slice of Twitter for the Slice of Life Story Challenge: Day 30.

I didn’t make it back on my desk last night to finish this. My head was spinning and just couldn’t get up from bed. Below is how I started it.

We are a day away from finishing this blogging challenge. What I have been thinking about is losing the connection that we have made here for a month. I learned¬†so much from reading everyone’s blog that I was able to get into, time permitting.

Before I got myself into blogging, I have been learning and growing personally and professionally by being connected through Twitter. My #PLN has inspired me to get out of my comfort zone, be more open to learning and mistakes, and challenge my thinking.

In random order, here is my Top 10 people that I follow that you may want to consider following.

  1. Jonathan So
  2. Aviva Dunsiger
  3. Jason Wigmore
  4. Tina Zita
  5. George Couros
  6. Phillip Cowell
  7. Doug Peterson
  8. Craig Kemp
  9. Brian Aspinall
  10. Andrew Campbell

One way or the other, you’ll pickup something from them. Better yet, you’ll share a laugh together.

Feel free to leave your Twitter account in the comment section. I am also just a tweet away: Vilma Manahan. This challenge is about to end but let’s continue the connectedness we have built around in a month’s time.

 

What’s in Your Lunch Bag?

A slice of healthy food for the Slice of Life Story Challenge: Day 23.

No matter which classroom or what grade I would be for recess or lunch duty, I would always look into what the students are taking out of their lunch bags. As soon as I see someone eating a chocolate cookie, a piece of cake or some chips during first break, I would come and see what else is in the bag and suggest that they have the treat later. Healthy food should be eaten first.

We should and need to continue to encourage students to practise healthy eating. Most of them have healthy packed snacks and lunches like veggies, fruits, rice, noodles, pasta or sandwiches. But a few have food that are loaded with sugar and salt.

Who am I to judge? There are a lot of possible reasons. It may be the situation at home. Maybe, parents or guardians are rushing out the door to go to work. Maybe, the family is trying to make ends meet.

How can we help? Schools that run a Breakfast Program is huge.¬†Sometimes, students come to school with an empty tummy. It’s also an opportunity for students to have a healthy breakfast if they are not getting it at home. There are also classrooms that have a container full of apple sauce and granola bars that students can help themselves when they don’t have enough food with them.

Nourishing the body is as important as nurturing the heart and developing the mind.¬†What’s your practice?

 

 

The Next 10-Day Reflection

A slice of the next 10-day for the Slice of Life Story Challenge: Day 21.

Last week was tough. If you have read my posts, you’d know it by now. Some of my posts needed more editing and details but time really made it impossible for me to do that and I felt that it may not really made sense. Still, I published them.

Here’s a compilation of my posts for the last 10 days. If you happen to get a chance to read one of them, please let me know how I can improve my work.

Day 11: A 10-Day Reflection

Day 12: A 7-Year Old MacBook, Vintage?

Day 13: Springing Forward

Day 14: Do You Know How to Take a Video?

Day 15: Great Friends

Day 16: A Salute to the Parents and Grandparents

Day 17: Making New Friends Through Play

Day 18: Family Bowling

Day 19: A Night of Laughter with Friends

Day 20: March Break Memories

I keep telling myself, “Keep pushing.”

 

 

Dear Snow,

You were all over the news yesterday. Everyone was talking about you. I knew it’s not going to be a Snow Day today because you’d stop before we all wake up.¬†Still, there’s that hope that you may want to extend your stay flying on the night sky.

First thing I did when I got up, peeked through the curtains to see if you’re still floating around. No. One more try. I checked the news. All buses are cancelled but schools are open.

Reality kicked in. It’s time to get going. As much as I would not say no to a Snow Day, while driving to work this morning, I also can imagine all the kids rolling down the mini hills, making snow angels, picking up a handful to put in their mouths, trying to build snowballs to put together to make a snowman or trekking down their way to the middle of the field to try to be away from the crowd.

The kindergartens were your first guests with their sleds and shovels tagged behind. From my window, I could see them up and down that little raised area of the field. It may be the best part of their day at school and something that they will be talking about when they get home. Your presence makes these young minds wonder, create, and be entertained during their outdoor time. When everyone had left at the end of the day, there were marks of enjoyment all over you.

Early today, I knew already that I will be talking about you on my second post for the Slice of Life Story Challenge, #sol16.

There were years that you’re pretty harsh on us but not much this time. Thank you for dropping by.

From,

Your Avid Fan (Well, not really)

P.S.

Please stay for a little while. I would like to go cross-country skiing on the easy loop this weekend.

 

 

Summer is Over! Now, What?

A new school year has started. This post may be a bit late but better get it done than saying, “I should have written about it,” later on in my blogging life.¬†Push. Push. Push. I told myself that I need to get back on track. The world doesn’t stop spinning. I should not stop from moving forward.

This summer, I did a lot of professional/personal learning through Twitter and it made me to connect more globally without leaving the comfort of my own home office for the most part. It didn’t come easy to disconnect as I continue to grow my #PLN. At some instances, even when I was camping.

Who would have thought that participating in some #educhats during the summer nights would lead to a great experience in co-hosting a global Twitter chat?

Craig Kemp offered¬†Jason Wigmore¬†and I to co-host #asiaED slow chat in August. Because of this, we’d met so many wonderful educators along the way. Even though the connection was made virtually, it felt like a great relationship was built. Jason and I looked forward at any given time of the day to check responses. Each and everyone shared great experiences and challenged each other’s thinking.

It was also a challenge on my part to manage and monitor two Twitter accounts: my own and @asiaEDchat especially when I wanted the views to come from one of the accounts in particular. A few times, I had to delete my tweet to change the source. Ugh!¬†That’s when Tweetdeck came handy. When I need it, I will learn it.

More can be said about it but OUR SUCCESS wouldn’t be possible without the PEOPLE who dedicated part of their time to pop in to share their two cents, retweet, promote or favourite our Q-a-Day tweet whether on summer break, sipping a cup of coffee, on a tour or from a long day at school. We are VERY GRATEFUL of your participation! Most importantly, we VALUE the CONNECTION we’d made.

As we are all back in school, I still look forward to continue to share the learning, the collaboration and the fun with my #PLN.

If I put my learning experience in a student’s perspective, each student in our class will look forward to spend each day in our classroom because they’re engaged, interested and having fun. I learned so much because I opened myself to learning through global connection. How do we see this fit with our students? With the curriculum? How would the students benefit if we let them learn beyond the walls of the school, out of our comfort zones as teachers?

In this age, WE BUILD BRIDGES, NOT WALLS for educators and students alike. When would you start to break the wall as a teacher? When would you start to build the bridge for your students?